Timeliness of Service Delivery for Children With Later-Identified Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss Purpose: In this study, the authors examined diagnostic and intervention services for children identified with hearing loss (HL) after the newborn period.Method: The authors compared ages at service delivery and length of delays between service delivery steps for 57 later-identified children with HL and 193 children who referred ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 2014

The Outcomes of Children with Hearing Loss (OCHL) logo is reprinted with permission from the Boys Town National Research Hospital in Omaha, NE.

Timeliness of Service Delivery for Children With Later-Identified Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth A. Walker
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Lenore Holte
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Meredith Spratford
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Jacob Oleson
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Anne Welhaven
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Melody Harrison
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
  • Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure:The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Elizabeth A. Walker: elizabeth-walker@uiowa.edu
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
  • © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Article
Research Article   |   March 2014
Timeliness of Service Delivery for Children With Later-Identified Mild-to-Severe Hearing Loss
American Journal of Audiology, March 2014, Vol. 23, 116-128. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/13-0031)
History: Received June 7, 2013 , Revised July 24, 2013 , Accepted August 4, 2013
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 2014, Vol. 23, 116-128. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/13-0031)
History: Received June 7, 2013; Revised July 24, 2013; Accepted August 4, 2013

Purpose: In this study, the authors examined diagnostic and intervention services for children identified with hearing loss (HL) after the newborn period.

Method: The authors compared ages at service delivery and length of delays between service delivery steps for 57 later-identified children with HL and 193 children who referred for assessment from the newborn hearing screen (NHS). For only later-identified children, regression models were used to investigate relationships among predictor variables and dependent variables related to service delivery.

Results: Children who referred from the NHS received follow-up services at younger ages than later-identified children. Later-identified children had significantly longer delays from HL confirmation to entry into early intervention, compared to children who referred from the NHS. For later-identified children, degree of HL predicted ages at follow-up clinical services. Children with more severe HL received services at younger ages compared to children with milder HL. Gender predicted the length of the delay from confirmation to entry into early intervention, with girls demonstrating shorter delays.

Conclusions: The current results lend support to the need for ongoing hearing monitoring programs after the neonatal period, particularly when children enter early intervention programs because of language/developmental delays.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant5 ROI DC009560-03 (coprincipal investigators: J. Bruce Tomblin, University of Iowa, and Mary Pat Moeller, Boys Town National Research Hospital). The content of this project is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders or the National Institutes of Health. We thank Mary Pat Moeller, Ryan McCreery, Brittan Barker, and Derek Stiles for their helpful comments on earlier versions of this article.
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