Innovation  |   June 2006
A Case Study of an Emerging Community-Based Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program: Part I. Parents’ Compliance
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeffrey L. Danhauer
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Carole E. Johnson
    Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    The first author is the owner of Hearing Consultants of California, the private audiology practice in this study, and is also the audiology consultant for the Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital newborn hearing screening program evaluated here.
    The first author is the owner of Hearing Consultants of California, the private audiology practice in this study, and is also the audiology consultant for the Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital newborn hearing screening program evaluated here.×
  • Contact author: Jeffrey L. Danhauer, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106. Email: danhauer@speech.ucsb.edu
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Healthcare Settings
Innovation   |   June 2006
A Case Study of an Emerging Community-Based Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program: Part I. Parents’ Compliance
American Journal of Audiology June 2006, Vol.15, 25-32. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2006/004)
History: Accepted 29 Jan 2006 , Received 17 Sep 2005 , Revised 08 Dec 2005
American Journal of Audiology June 2006, Vol.15, 25-32. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2006/004)
History: Accepted 29 Jan 2006 , Received 17 Sep 2005 , Revised 08 Dec 2005

Purpose: This is the first of a 2-part series of articles that describe and assess an emerging community-based early hearing detection and intervention program. This study investigated parents’ compliance for accessing services for their infants at 5 levels in the process from referrals through subsequent follow-up during a 3-year period. Compliance was defined as parents’ follow-through with professionals’ recommendations and appointments for their infants’ hearing health care.

Method: Investigators retrospectively reviewed the charts of 51 infants who were referred from a regional hospital’s newborn hearing screening program to a private practice office and were seen from March 2000 to February 2003.

Results: Compliance was 100% for initial hospital inpatient screening and for outpatient rescreening but decreased throughout the referral process. All of the parents of babies with hearing loss complied, and their infants were diagnosed by age 3 months and received audiologic or otologic intervention by age 6 months. Only half of those who needed and opted for hearing aids complied and began habilitative intervention by age 6 months.

Conclusions: Although compliance for initial and follow-up screening was excellent and met goals for national benchmarks, compliance for intervention services showed room for improvement.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access