Multimedia Hearing Handicap Inventory: Reliability and Clinical Utility Purpose: This preliminary study evaluated the test–retest reliability, internal-consistency reliability, and listener reactions to the design and functional utility of the Multimedia Hearing Handicap Inventory (MHHI).Method: Participants were 51 adults exhibiting hearing sensitivity ranging from normal hearing to severe hearing loss. Different test–retest sequences, using different combinations of ... Innovation
Innovation  |   June 2006
Multimedia Hearing Handicap Inventory: Reliability and Clinical Utility
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sara S. Holcomb
    Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Jerry L. Punch
    Michigan State University, East Lansing
  • Contact author: Sara Holcomb, Department of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824-1212. Email: shogrens@msu.edu
  • © 2006 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging
Innovation   |   June 2006
Multimedia Hearing Handicap Inventory: Reliability and Clinical Utility
American Journal of Audiology, June 2006, Vol. 15, 3-13. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2006/002)
History: Received July 11, 2004 , Accepted November 30, 2005
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2006, Vol. 15, 3-13. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2006/002)
History: Received July 11, 2004; Accepted November 30, 2005

Purpose: This preliminary study evaluated the test–retest reliability, internal-consistency reliability, and listener reactions to the design and functional utility of the Multimedia Hearing Handicap Inventory (MHHI).

Method: Participants were 51 adults exhibiting hearing sensitivity ranging from normal hearing to severe hearing loss. Different test–retest sequences, using different combinations of the long and short programs of the MHHI, were administered to 3 experimental groups composed of 17 participants each. An exit interview was used to evaluate the MHHI’s clinical utility.

Results: Results revealed the MHHI to have high test–retest reliability and high internal-consistency reliability, and thus to have statistical properties similar to those of the original screening versions of the Hearing Handicap Inventories for Adults and for the Elderly. Participant feedback regarding the MHHI’s overall clinical utility, the informational content of its long program, and the Hearing Profile feature was highly positive.

Conclusions: Results demonstrate the clinical potential of a multimedia approach in advancing the audiologic rehabilitation process.

Acknowledgments
The All-University Outreach Grant Program and Libraries, Computing and Technology, Michigan State University, provided support for the development of the MHHI. The reported experiments are based on a master’s thesis by the first author (Shogren, 1999), under the direction of the second author. Jill Elfenbein and Brad Rakerd served as members of the thesis committee. Brad Rakerd and three anonymous reviewers provided constructive comments on the manuscript. Portions of this study were presented at the 12th Annual Convention of the American Academy of Audiology, Chicago, March 2000.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access