A Case Study of an Emerging Community-Based Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program: Part II. Team Building With Otolaryngologists and Pediatricians Using a Survey Approach Purpose: Physicians are vital team members of early hearing detection and intervention programs (EHDIPs), particularly in encouraging parents to comply with recommendations for follow-up services for their infants in universal newborn hearing screening programs (UNHSPs). This study describes a survey approach to help audiologists partner with otolaryngologists and pediatricians ... Innovation
Innovation  |   June 2006
A Case Study of an Emerging Community-Based Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program: Part II. Team Building With Otolaryngologists and Pediatricians Using a Survey Approach
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeffrey L. Danhauer
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Carole E. Johnson
    Auburn University, Auburn, AL
  • Dan Finnegan
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Katherine Hansen
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Marilene Lamb
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Ilian Priscilla Lopez
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Caitlin Meuel
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Angela Pecile
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Shelby Resnick
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Victoria Williams
    University of California Santa Barbara
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    The first author is the owner of Hearing Consultants of California, the private audiology practice in this study, and is also the audiology consultant for the Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital newborn hearing screening program evaluated here.
    The first author is the owner of Hearing Consultants of California, the private audiology practice in this study, and is also the audiology consultant for the Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital newborn hearing screening program evaluated here.×
  • Contact author: Jeffrey L. Danhauer, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106. Email: danhauer@speech.ucsb.edu
  • © 2006 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention
Innovation   |   June 2006
A Case Study of an Emerging Community-Based Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program: Part II. Team Building With Otolaryngologists and Pediatricians Using a Survey Approach
American Journal of Audiology, June 2006, Vol. 15, 33-45. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2006/005)
History: Received March 13, 2005 , Revised September 9, 2005 , Accepted January 25, 2006
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2006, Vol. 15, 33-45. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2006/005)
History: Received March 13, 2005; Revised September 9, 2005; Accepted January 25, 2006

Purpose: Physicians are vital team members of early hearing detection and intervention programs (EHDIPs), particularly in encouraging parents to comply with recommendations for follow-up services for their infants in universal newborn hearing screening programs (UNHSPs). This study describes a survey approach to help audiologists partner with otolaryngologists and pediatricians in EHDIPs.

Method: We developed and mailed a 19-item questionnaire to all 12 otolaryngologists and 66 pediatricians potentially involved in a community-based EHDIP. The questionnaire assessed respondents’ demographic data and knowledge of, experiences with, and attitudes toward the service-delivery continuum of UNHSPs.

Results: The overall response rate was 45%; all 12 otolaryngologists responded (100%; data from 7 were analyzed), and 23 pediatricians responded (34.8%; all were analyzed). Generally, they were positive toward and knowledgeable about UNHSPs and believed that (a) parent/infant bonding is unaffected by screening, (b) hearing reevaluations following medical services are important, (c) audiologists perform their role adequately, (d) it is important that hearing losses be identified and interventions begun before infants reach 6 months of age, (e) UNHSPs deserve funding, and (f) their role is important, but the physicians also wanted improvements in parent education and referral/follow-ups.

Conclusion: The survey method was effective in identifying participating physicians’ informational needs and attitudes toward UNHSPs, and in designing outreach programs for them.

Acknowledgments
Appreciation is expressed to Anna Abbott, Kimberly Danhauer, Jeffrey Tatum Danhauer, Lauren Rowinski, and Ashley Brouwer for their assistance in data collection, analysis, comments, and suggestions for changes leading to the final versions of the questionnaire. Preliminary results for portions of this work were presented at the Annual Convention and Exposition of the American Academy of Audiology, March 31–April 3, 2004, in Salt Lake City, UT.
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