Serial Position Effects for Acoustic Stimuli Among Children With and Without Hearing Loss Purpose This study investigated serial position effects on auditory sequential organization among children with hearing loss and with normal hearing. Method Forty-eight children were divided into 4 equally sized groups: 2 groups of 6–7-year-olds and 2 groups of 9–10-year-olds. Each age group had 12 children with normal hearing ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2006
Serial Position Effects for Acoustic Stimuli Among Children With and Without Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Benoît Jutras
    Université de Montréal, Sainte-Justine Hospital Research Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Contact author: Benoît Jutras, École d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, Université de Montréal, P.O. Box 6128, Centre-ville Station, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7, Canada. Email: benoit.jutras@umontreal.ca
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2006
Serial Position Effects for Acoustic Stimuli Among Children With and Without Hearing Loss
American Journal of Audiology, June 2006, Vol. 15, 57-65. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2006/007)
History: Received March 17, 2005 , Revised August 20, 2005 , Accepted January 26, 2006
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2006, Vol. 15, 57-65. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2006/007)
History: Received March 17, 2005; Revised August 20, 2005; Accepted January 26, 2006

Purpose This study investigated serial position effects on auditory sequential organization among children with hearing loss and with normal hearing.

Method Forty-eight children were divided into 4 equally sized groups: 2 groups of 6–7-year-olds and 2 groups of 9–10-year-olds. Each age group had 12 children with normal hearing and 12 children with sensorineural hearing loss. Participants were asked to reproduce auditory sequences of verbal (syllables /ba/ and /da/) and nonverbal (1-kHz pure tone and a wideband noise) elements by pressing associated buttons.

Results No evidence of a recency effect was found, but a primacy effect was observed in the participants’ performance under most experimental conditions. Normal hearing participants in the 6–7-year-old group were better at reproducing 3 to 5 verbal items than their counterparts with hearing loss, independent of item sequence position.

Conclusion Results suggest that, regardless of hearing status, all children use similar mnemonic strategies.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded in part by the Réseau de recherche en réadaptation de Montréal et de l’Ouest du Québec. The author is grateful to both the children who took part in the project and their parents. The author also would like to thank Nathalie Saindon, Marilène Gagnon, Claude Allard, and Margaret McKyes for their valuable assistance.
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