Children’s Speech Recognition and Loudness Perception With the Desired Sensation Level v5 Quiet and Noise Prescriptions Purpose To determine whether Desired Sensation Level (DSL) v5 Noise is a viable hearing instrument prescriptive algorithm for children, in comparison with DSL v5 Quiet. In particular, the authors compared children’s performance on measures of consonant recognition in quiet, sentence recognition in noise, and loudness perception when fitted with DSL ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2012
Children’s Speech Recognition and Loudness Perception With the Desired Sensation Level v5 Quiet and Noise Prescriptions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeffery Crukley
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
  • Susan D. Scollie
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
  • Correspondence to Jeffery Crukley: jcrukley@uwo.ca
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2012
Children’s Speech Recognition and Loudness Perception With the Desired Sensation Level v5 Quiet and Noise Prescriptions
American Journal of Audiology, December 2012, Vol. 21, 149-162. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2012/12-0002)
History: Received January 15, 2012 , Accepted May 1, 2012
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2012, Vol. 21, 149-162. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2012/12-0002)
History: Received January 15, 2012; Accepted May 1, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Purpose To determine whether Desired Sensation Level (DSL) v5 Noise is a viable hearing instrument prescriptive algorithm for children, in comparison with DSL v5 Quiet. In particular, the authors compared children’s performance on measures of consonant recognition in quiet, sentence recognition in noise, and loudness perception when fitted with DSL v5 Quiet and Noise.

Method Eleven children (ages 8 to 17 years) with stable, congenital sensorineural hearing losses participated in the study. Participants were fitted bilaterally to DSL v5 prescriptions with behind-the-ear hearing instruments. The order of prescription was counterbalanced across participants. Repeated measures analysis of variance was used to compare performance between prescriptions.

Results Use of the Noise prescription resulted in a significant decrease in consonant perception in Quiet with low-level input, but no difference with average-level input. There was no significant difference in sentence-in-noise recognition between the two prescriptions. Loudness ratings for input levels above 72 dB SPL were significantly lower with the noise prescription.

Conclusions Average-level consonant recognition in quiet was preserved and aversive loudness was alleviated by the Noise prescription relative to the quiet prescription, which suggests that the DSL v5 Noise prescription may be an effective approach to managing the nonquiet listening needs of children with hearing loss.

Acknowledgments
Support for this work was provided by the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada and the Masons Help 2 Hear Foundation. We thank the local school board for supporting the implementation of the data collection protocol. We thank Phonak AG for donating hearing instruments and Supportive Hearing Systems for loaning the sound equipment used in this study. A special thanks to Andrea Dunn and Stella Ng for their assistance.
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