Research Article  |   December 2012
Factors Influencing Follow-Up to Newborn Hearing Screening for Infants Who Are Hard of Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth Walker
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Jacob Oleson
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Meredith Spratford
    Boystown National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Mary Pat Moeller
    Boystown National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Patricia Roush
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC
  • Hua Ou
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Correspondence to Lenore Holte: lenore-holte@uiowa.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Article
Research Article   |   December 2012
Factors Influencing Follow-Up to Newborn Hearing Screening for Infants Who Are Hard of Hearing
American Journal of Audiology, December 2012, Vol. 21, 163-174. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2012/12-0016)
History: Received March 19, 2012 , Accepted May 4, 2012
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2012, Vol. 21, 163-174. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2012/12-0016)
History: Received March 19, 2012; Accepted May 4, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5

Purpose: To document the epidemiological characteristics of a group of children who are hard of hearing, identify individual predictor variables for timely follow-up after a failed newborn hearing screening, and identify barriers to follow-up encountered by families.

Method: The authors used an accelerated longitudinal design to investigate outcomes for children who are hard of hearing in a large, multicenter study. The present study involved a subgroup of 193 children with hearing loss who did not pass the newborn hearing screening. The authors used available records to capture ages of confirmation of hearing loss, hearing aid fitting, and entry into early intervention. Linear regression models were used to investigate relationships among individual predictor variables and age at each follow-up benchmark.

Results: Of several predictor variables, only higher levels of maternal education were significantly associated with earlier confirmation of hearing loss and fitting of hearing aids; severity of hearing loss was not. No variables were significantly associated with age of entry into early intervention. Each recommended benchmark was met by a majority of children, but only one third met all of the benchmarks within the recommended time frame.

Conclusion: Results suggest that underserved communities need extra support in navigating steps that follow failed newborn hearing screening.

Acknowledgments
This publication was made possible by Grant Number R01 DC009560 from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the NIDCD or the National Institutes of Health. We thank Richard Arenas and Shana Jacobs for assistance with data collection and manuscript preparation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access