Quantitative and Qualitative Follow-Up Outcomes From a Preschool Audiologic Screening Program: Perspectives Over a Decade Purpose This investigation reports on quantitative and qualitative follow-up information obtained from a preschool audiologic screening program covering a 10-year period (1995 to 2004). Method The audiologic screening consisted of a hearing (pure tone) and tympanometry screening. A total of 34,979 children, 3 to 5 years of age, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2007
Quantitative and Qualitative Follow-Up Outcomes From a Preschool Audiologic Screening Program: Perspectives Over a Decade
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yula C. Serpanos
    Adelphi University, Garden City, NY
  • Fredi Jarmel
    Montclair State University, Clifton, NJ
  • Contact author: Yula C. Serpanos, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Adelphi University, Hy Weinberg Center for Communication Disorders, 158 Cambridge Avenue, Garden City, NY 11530. E-mail: serpanos@adelphi.edu.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / School-Based Settings / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2007
Quantitative and Qualitative Follow-Up Outcomes From a Preschool Audiologic Screening Program: Perspectives Over a Decade
American Journal of Audiology, June 2007, Vol. 16, 4-12. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2007/002)
History: Received June 20, 2006 , Revised December 8, 2006 , Accepted April 10, 2007
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2007, Vol. 16, 4-12. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2007/002)
History: Received June 20, 2006; Revised December 8, 2006; Accepted April 10, 2007

Purpose This investigation reports on quantitative and qualitative follow-up information obtained from a preschool audiologic screening program covering a 10-year period (1995 to 2004).

Method The audiologic screening consisted of a hearing (pure tone) and tympanometry screening. A total of 34,979 children, 3 to 5 years of age, were screened.

Results Eighteen percent (6,337) of the children were referred for further hearing and/or medical ear evaluation. Of 1,421 follow-up responses received, 93% complied with the follow-up recommendations while 7% did not. Of 1,316 children in the follow-up group, outer and/or middle ear disorder in one or both ears was medically confirmed for 37%. Unilateral or bilateral hearing loss was diagnosed in 18% as conductive (12%), sensorineural (1%), mixed (0.4%), or unspecified (5%). Overall, hearing loss and/or otologic disorder was confirmed in 49% of the follow-up group, suggesting a prevalence of 1.8% in a preschool-age population. A small (n = 32) sample of unsolicited comments indicated that physicians most influenced noncompliance with hearing evaluation follow-up.

Conclusions The quantitative hearing and otologic follow-up outcome data affirm the importance of audiologic screening in the preschool population. Qualitative data suggest that some physicians may not be advocating appropriate screening follow-up services.

Acknowledgments
The LIHSP would not be possible without the efforts of the graduate students at Adelphi University, Hofstra University, St. John’s University, Long Island University-C.W. Post, Queens College, and the Long Island AuD Consortium. Stella Gershkovich is specially acknowledged for her assistance with data entry. A portion of this article was presented at the national meetings of the American Academy of Audiology, Minneapolis, MN, April 7, 2006, and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Miami Beach, FL, November 18, 2006.
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