Research Article  |   June 2009
Test Order Effects of Computerized Dynamic Posturography and Calorics
Author Notes
  • Contact author: Jill Bernstein, who is now with Hearing Evaluation Services of Buffalo, 4949 Harlem Road, Amherst, NY 14226. E-mail: jillcbernstein@gmail.com.
Article Information
Balance & Balance Disorders
Research Article   |   June 2009
Test Order Effects of Computerized Dynamic Posturography and Calorics
American Journal of Audiology, June 2009, Vol. 18, 34-44. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2009/08-0024)
History: Received August 3, 2008 , Accepted December 15, 2008
American Journal of Audiology, June 2009, Vol. 18, 34-44. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2009/08-0024)
History: Received August 3, 2008; Accepted December 15, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose: To determine whether there is a test order effect of the caloric subtest of videonystagmography on the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) of computerized dynamic posturography, and to assess the learning effect of multiple posturography test sessions on the SOT score.

Method: Scores on the 6 SOT conditions before and after caloric testing were compared for 10 participants age 18–36 years. Four SOT sessions were completed prior to caloric testing to assess the presence of a learning effect and establish precaloric baseline SOT scores. All participants had normal vestibular systems with no history of dizziness or imbalance.

Results: Caloric testing had a significant effect on the equilibrium score for only 1 of 6 test conditions. While meeting statistical significance, the actual change in score for this condition was very small. Equilibrium scores improved for the more difficult test conditions between the 1st and 2nd SOT sessions.

Conclusion: Results indicate that there are minimal test order effects of calorics on the SOT. Results confirm that a significant improvement in score for more challenging test conditions occurs between SOT Sessions 1 and 2 as a result of learning. Therefore, clinicians must be cautious when using posturography to monitor patient improvement.

Acknowledgments
This work was completed in partial fulfillment of the doctor of audiology degree for the first author in the Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences at the University at Buffalo. Jeff Lezynski is thanked for serving as a committee member for this student research project.
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