Advancing Tinnitus Research: Tales From a Grand Meeting at Grand Island, NY Scientific conferences play an important role in updating knowledge and improving our conceptualizations of selected topics of interest. They are a healthy way for promoting discussion/debate and providing a segue for the advancement of science. When this is done in a pleasant and congenial atmosphere, it enhances the experience ... Editorial
Editorial  |   December 01, 2008
Advancing Tinnitus Research: Tales From a Grand Meeting at Grand Island, NY
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anthony T. Cacace
    American Journal of Audiology
Article Information
Editorials
Editorial   |   December 01, 2008
Advancing Tinnitus Research: Tales From a Grand Meeting at Grand Island, NY
American Journal of Audiology, December 2008, Vol. 17, 107. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2008/ed-02)
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2008, Vol. 17, 107. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2008/ed-02)
Scientific conferences play an important role in updating knowledge and improving our conceptualizations of selected topics of interest. They are a healthy way for promoting discussion/debate and providing a segue for the advancement of science. When this is done in a pleasant and congenial atmosphere, it enhances the experience and no doubt helps to consolidate and shape our memories in a positive way. “Advances in Tinnitus Assessment, Treatment, and Neuroscience Basis” was the title and theme of a meeting in June 2007 that embraced these attributes for success. It was spearheaded by Dr. Richard J. Salvi, sponsored by the Center for Hearing & Deafness, and organized by a group of enthusiastic individuals from the University at Buffalo (Altman, Lobarinas, Roberts, Stocking, & Sun). The appeal and timing of this conference were evidenced by the fact that several hundred clinicians and scientists from the United States and around the world (Belgium, Canada, China, Finland, Germany, Italy, Japan, and South America) attended and participated in keynote addresses, podium presentations, posters, and interactive discussions. While the overall science at the meeting was exceptional, it was equally matched by the beautiful scenery of upstate New York and the selection of a venue (hotel/conference center) that was situated on the shores of the Niagara River and was in close proximity to another well-known natural resource, Niagara Falls.
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