Exposure to Disability and Hearing Loss Narratives in Undergraduate Audiology Curriculum Purpose To determine whether exposure to disability and hearing loss narratives increased undergraduate communication sciences and disorders (CSD) students' affective responses to scenarios of individuals with hearing impairment. Method Thirty-five CSD undergraduates responded to 8 scenarios (K. English, L. L. Mendel, T. Rojeski, & J. Hornak, 1999). Sixteen ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2008
Exposure to Disability and Hearing Loss Narratives in Undergraduate Audiology Curriculum
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Abbey L. Berg
    Pace University, New York, and College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York
  • Maryrose Canellas
    Pace University and Teachers College, Columbia University
  • Stephen Salbod
    Pace University
  • Richard Velayo
    Pace University
  • Contact author: Abbey L. Berg, Communication Sciences & Disorders Program, Department of Biology & Health Sciences, Pace University, 1 Pace Plaza, New York, NY 10038. E-mail: aberg@pace.edu or alb35@columbia.edu.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2008
Exposure to Disability and Hearing Loss Narratives in Undergraduate Audiology Curriculum
American Journal of Audiology, December 2008, Vol. 17, 123-128. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2008/08-0001)
History: Received January 6, 2008 , Revised April 8, 2008 , Accepted May 30, 2008
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2008, Vol. 17, 123-128. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2008/08-0001)
History: Received January 6, 2008; Revised April 8, 2008; Accepted May 30, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose To determine whether exposure to disability and hearing loss narratives increased undergraduate communication sciences and disorders (CSD) students' affective responses to scenarios of individuals with hearing impairment.

Method Thirty-five CSD undergraduates responded to 8 scenarios (K. English, L. L. Mendel, T. Rojeski, & J. Hornak, 1999). Sixteen students completed a course in audiologic rehabilitation with no exposure to disability and hearing loss narratives; 19 students completed the same course with exposure. Two audiologists, independent and blind to group status, rated the 35 student responses for affective and technical content.

Results Students exposed to the narratives incorporated more affective elements into their technical responses than students not exposed.

Conclusions Narratives appear to be effective in increasing affective elements in students' technical/informational responses and may have a place and be of value in undergraduate CSD curriculum.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this article were presented at the New York State Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, Saratoga Springs, NY, April 29, 2006, where the second author of this article received the Undergraduate Research Award. The second author’s work was conducted as an undergraduate in the Department of Biology & Health Sciences, Pace University.
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