Acceptance of Noise With Intelligible, Reversed, and Unfamiliar Primary Discourse Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of intelligible and unintelligible primary discourse on acceptance of noise. Of particular interest was the effect of intelligibility on the most comfortable loudness (MCL) component of acceptable noise level (ANL). Method ANLs were measured for 30 participants ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2008
Acceptance of Noise With Intelligible, Reversed, and Unfamiliar Primary Discourse
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Gordon-Hickey
    University of South Alabama, Mobile
  • Robert E. Moore
    University of South Alabama, Mobile
  • Contact author: Susan Gordon-Hickey, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 2000 UCOM, University of South Alabama, Mobile, AL 36688-0002. E-mail: gordonhickey@usouthal.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2008
Acceptance of Noise With Intelligible, Reversed, and Unfamiliar Primary Discourse
American Journal of Audiology, December 2008, Vol. 17, 129-135. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2008/06-0018)
History: Received July 26, 2006 , Revised March 14, 2007 , Accepted July 2, 2008
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2008, Vol. 17, 129-135. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2008/06-0018)
History: Received July 26, 2006; Revised March 14, 2007; Accepted July 2, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 20

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of intelligible and unintelligible primary discourse on acceptance of noise. Of particular interest was the effect of intelligibility on the most comfortable loudness (MCL) component of acceptable noise level (ANL).

Method ANLs were measured for 30 participants using an intelligible discourse, a reversed discourse, and an unfamiliar primary discourse. For each discourse, MCL and background noise level (BNL) were found. The ANL was then computed by subtracting the mean BNL from the MCL.

Results The intelligibility of the primary discourse did not affect MCL. The ANL was significantly different for the intelligible versus reversed condition and the intelligible versus unfamiliar (Chinese) condition.

Conclusion Results indicate that ANL may change as speech intelligibility changes and/or speech recognition ability decreases in adults with normal hearing.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access