Benefits of Adaptive FM Systems on Speech Recognition in Noise for Listeners Who Use Hearing Aids Purpose To compare the benefits of adaptive FM and fixed FM systems through measurement of speech recognition in noise with adults and students in clinical and real-world settings. Method Five adults and 5 students with moderate-to-severe hearing loss completed objective and subjective speech recognition in noise measures with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2010
Benefits of Adaptive FM Systems on Speech Recognition in Noise for Listeners Who Use Hearing Aids
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Thibodeau
    University of Texas at Dallas, Callier Center for Communication Disorders
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    The information listed in this article was presented at Phonak training seminars at the July 2009 annual meeting of the Educational Audiology Association (New Orleans, LA). Phonak provided financial support for this study.
    The information listed in this article was presented at Phonak training seminars at the July 2009 annual meeting of the Educational Audiology Association (New Orleans, LA). Phonak provided financial support for this study.×
  • Contact author: Linda Thibodeau, Advanced Hearing Research Center, University of Texas at Dallas, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75080. E-mail: thib@utdallas.edu.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2010
Benefits of Adaptive FM Systems on Speech Recognition in Noise for Listeners Who Use Hearing Aids
American Journal of Audiology, June 2010, Vol. 19, 36-45. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2010/09-0014)
History: Received June 4, 2009 , Revised December 23, 2009 , Accepted March 8, 2010
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2010, Vol. 19, 36-45. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2010/09-0014)
History: Received June 4, 2009; Revised December 23, 2009; Accepted March 8, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose To compare the benefits of adaptive FM and fixed FM systems through measurement of speech recognition in noise with adults and students in clinical and real-world settings.

Method Five adults and 5 students with moderate-to-severe hearing loss completed objective and subjective speech recognition in noise measures with the 2 types of FM processing. Sentence recognition was evaluated in a classroom for 5 competing noise levels ranging from 54 to 80 dBA while the FM microphone was positioned 6 in. from the signal loudspeaker to receive input at 84 dB SPL. The subjective measures included 2 classroom activities and 6 auditory lessons in a noisy, public aquarium.

Results On the objective measures, adaptive FM processing resulted in significantly better speech recognition in noise than fixed FM processing for 68- and 73-dBA noise levels. On the subjective measures, all individuals preferred adaptive over fixed processing for half of the activities. Adaptive processing was also preferred by most (8–9) individuals for the remaining 4 activities.

Conclusion The adaptive FM processing resulted in significant improvements at the higher noise levels and was preferred by the majority of participants in most of the conditions.

Acknowledgments
The assistance by Martin Luetzen while working at Phonak is gratefully acknowledged. Data collection and analysis were facilitated by University of Texas at Dallas doctoral students Lindsay Bondurant, Jessica Sullivan, Gregory Nelson, Sarah Tillman, and Ivonne Perez-Cervantes. The cooperation of staff at the Dallas World Aquarium is also gratefully appreciated.
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