Research Article  |   June 2012
Development and Evaluation of an English Language Measure of Detection of Word-Final Plurality Markers: The University of Western Ontario Plurals Test
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Scollie
    The University of Western Ontario, Canada
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    A portion of test development and data collection for the work presented in this paper was supported by a Collaborative Health Research Project grant that was cofunded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Matching funds and in-kind support (hearing aids) for this grant were provided by Phonak AG.
    A portion of test development and data collection for the work presented in this paper was supported by a Collaborative Health Research Project grant that was cofunded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. Matching funds and in-kind support (hearing aids) for this grant were provided by Phonak AG.×
    Phonak AG has since licensed the test described in this paper for distribution to clinical audiologists. Licensing fees are received by the University of Western Ontario and are applied to further research and technology transfer. Drs. Scollie and Glista have provided continuing education lectures under Phonak sponsorship on various topics broadly related to pediatric hearing aid fitting and technology-related outcomes. Dr. Scollie is a member of the Phonak Pediatric Advisory Board. This test is made available by Phonak at no charge to clinicians. Licensing fees for the distribution of this test are received by the University of Western Ontario and are applied to research efforts.
    Phonak AG has since licensed the test described in this paper for distribution to clinical audiologists. Licensing fees are received by the University of Western Ontario and are applied to further research and technology transfer. Drs. Scollie and Glista have provided continuing education lectures under Phonak sponsorship on various topics broadly related to pediatric hearing aid fitting and technology-related outcomes. Dr. Scollie is a member of the Phonak Pediatric Advisory Board. This test is made available by Phonak at no charge to clinicians. Licensing fees for the distribution of this test are received by the University of Western Ontario and are applied to research efforts.×
  • Correspondence to Danielle Glista: daglista@nca.uwo.ca
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Professional Issues & Training / Research Article
Research Article   |   June 2012
Development and Evaluation of an English Language Measure of Detection of Word-Final Plurality Markers: The University of Western Ontario Plurals Test
American Journal of Audiology, June 2012, Vol. 21, 76-81. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2012/11-0036)
History: Received November 23, 2011 , Accepted February 6, 2012
American Journal of Audiology, June 2012, Vol. 21, 76-81. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2012/11-0036)
History: Received November 23, 2011; Accepted February 6, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose: This article describes the development and evaluation of The University of Western Ontario (UWO) Plurals Test, which is an English language measure of detection of the word-final fricative cue for plurality.

Method: Normative data are provided for 26 listeners with normal hearing and 24 listeners with hearing impairment (children and adults), as are evaluations of the acoustical properties of the stimuli, the test’s test–retest reliability, and the test’s sensitivity to changes in hearing aid signal processing (e.g., nonlinear frequency compression).

Results: Results indicate reliable, repeated outcome measurement at the level of the individual. When compared to a global measure of real-world listening preference, the UWO Plurals Test was found to be somewhat sensitive to the effects of changes in hearing aid signal processing.

Conclusion: Findings suggest potential use of the UWO Plurals Test to evaluate aided and unaided ability of listeners between the ages of 6 and 81 years to detect the word-final fricatives /s/ and /z/ as they occur in English plural nouns.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada and Canadian Institutes of Health Research (Collaborative Health Research Project #313114-2005), The Hearing Foundation of Canada, The Canada Foundation for Innovation, the Masonic Foundation of Ontario Help-2-Hear Project, and Phonak AG. Special thanks to Andrea Dunn, Andreas Seelisch, Julie Seto, Julianne Tenhaaf, Marlene Bagatto, and Melissa Polonenko for their contributions to this work.
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