Article  |   December 2010
Do Group Audiologic Rehabilitation Activities Influence Psychosocial Outcomes?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jill E. Preminger
    University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY
  • Jae K. Yoo
    University of Louisville School of Public Health
  • Contact author: Jill E. Preminger, Program in Audiology, Myers Hall, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292. E-mail: jill.preminger@louisville.edu.
  • Jae K. Yoo is now at Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
    Jae K. Yoo is now at Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.×
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation
Article   |   December 2010
Do Group Audiologic Rehabilitation Activities Influence Psychosocial Outcomes?
American Journal of Audiology December 2010, Vol.19, 109-125. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2010/09-0027)
History: Accepted 24 Jun 2010 , Received 29 Sep 2009
American Journal of Audiology December 2010, Vol.19, 109-125. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2010/09-0027)
History: Accepted 24 Jun 2010 , Received 29 Sep 2009

Purpose: To attempt to determine whether group audiologic rehabilitation (AR) content affected psychosocial outcomes.

Method: A randomized controlled trial with at least 17 participants per group was completed. The 3 treatment groups included a communication strategies training group, a communication strategies training plus psychosocial exercise group, and an informational lecture plus psychosocial exercise group. Evaluations were conducted preclass, postclass, and 6-months postclass; they included hearing loss–related and generic quality of life scales, and a class evaluation form.

Results: All treatment groups demonstrated short- and long-term improvement on the hearing loss–related quality of life scale. Minimal differences were measured across treatment groups. A significant difference was observed between the lecture plus psychosocial exercise group and the communication strategies training group for 1 hearing loss–related quality of life subscale. Better outcomes were measured for the 2 groups with psychosocial exercises versus the communication strategies training group on 1 generic quality of life subscale. The results for the class evaluation did not discriminate among the treatment groups.

Conclusions: Class content had only a minimal influence on treatment outcomes. Recommended AR class content includes a mix of interventions including information, training, and psychosocial exercises.

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