Article  |   December 2010
Do Group Audiologic Rehabilitation Activities Influence Psychosocial Outcomes?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jill E. Preminger
    University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY
  • Jae K. Yoo
    University of Louisville School of Public Health
  • Contact author: Jill E. Preminger, Program in Audiology, Myers Hall, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY 40292. E-mail: jill.preminger@louisville.edu.
  • Jae K. Yoo is now at Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
    Jae K. Yoo is now at Ewha Womans University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation
Article   |   December 2010
Do Group Audiologic Rehabilitation Activities Influence Psychosocial Outcomes?
American Journal of Audiology, December 2010, Vol. 19, 109-125. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2010/09-0027)
History: Received September 29, 2009 , Accepted June 24, 2010
American Journal of Audiology, December 2010, Vol. 19, 109-125. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2010/09-0027)
History: Received September 29, 2009; Accepted June 24, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose: To attempt to determine whether group audiologic rehabilitation (AR) content affected psychosocial outcomes.

Method: A randomized controlled trial with at least 17 participants per group was completed. The 3 treatment groups included a communication strategies training group, a communication strategies training plus psychosocial exercise group, and an informational lecture plus psychosocial exercise group. Evaluations were conducted preclass, postclass, and 6-months postclass; they included hearing loss–related and generic quality of life scales, and a class evaluation form.

Results: All treatment groups demonstrated short- and long-term improvement on the hearing loss–related quality of life scale. Minimal differences were measured across treatment groups. A significant difference was observed between the lecture plus psychosocial exercise group and the communication strategies training group for 1 hearing loss–related quality of life subscale. Better outcomes were measured for the 2 groups with psychosocial exercises versus the communication strategies training group on 1 generic quality of life subscale. The results for the class evaluation did not discriminate among the treatment groups.

Conclusions: Class content had only a minimal influence on treatment outcomes. Recommended AR class content includes a mix of interventions including information, training, and psychosocial exercises.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant 5R03DC004939-02 (“The Efficacy of Group Aural Rehabilitation Programs”) and with resources at the Louisville VA Medical Center. Portions of this article were presented at the meeting of the American Auditory Society, Scottsdale, AZ, March 2006. We would like to thank the many students who have worked on this project: Scott Anderson, James Baer, Tara Blalock, Mitchell Campbell, Elizabeth Everett White, Miriam Harris-Shelton, Jennifer Leddy, Jodee Pride, Emily Schauwecker, Jeff Shannon, and Allison Young.
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