Room Modes With Regard to Speech Intelligibility in Classrooms: Response to Shalkouhi (2010) Purpose To respond to comments by Shalkouhi (2010)  on the article “Background Noise Levels and Reverberation Times in Unoccupied Classrooms: Predictions and Measurements” by Knecht, Nelson, Whitelaw, and Feth (2002) . Method The Schroeder frequencies calculated by Shalkouhi (2010)  were compared with the octave-band weighting factors used by Steeneken ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   December 01, 2010
Room Modes With Regard to Speech Intelligibility in Classrooms: Response to Shalkouhi (2010)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lawrence L. Feth
    Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Peggy B. Nelson
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Richard D. Godfrey
    Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Gail M. Whitelaw
    Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Contact author: Lawrence L. Feth, Ohio State University—Speech and Hearing Science, 110 Pressey Hall, 1070 Carmack Road, Columbus, OH 43210. E-mail: feth.1@osu.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   December 01, 2010
Room Modes With Regard to Speech Intelligibility in Classrooms: Response to Shalkouhi (2010)
American Journal of Audiology, December 2010, Vol. 19, 142. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2010/10-0017)
History: Received April 29, 2010 , Accepted May 21, 2010
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2010, Vol. 19, 142. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2010/10-0017)
History: Received April 29, 2010; Accepted May 21, 2010

Purpose To respond to comments by Shalkouhi (2010)  on the article “Background Noise Levels and Reverberation Times in Unoccupied Classrooms: Predictions and Measurements” by Knecht, Nelson, Whitelaw, and Feth (2002) .

Method The Schroeder frequencies calculated by Shalkouhi (2010)  were compared with the octave-band weighting factors used by Steeneken and Houtgast (1980)  in their calculation of the Speech Transmission Index.

Results To assess the potential impact of invalid reverberation times measured at 125 Hz on speech understanding in the classrooms, we note that the weight given to the octave band at 125 Hz is 0.0.

Conclusions Since the octave band of background noise centered on 125 Hz has no impact on speech understanding, we suggest that reverberation time measures at 125 Hz are unnecessary.

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