Toward Developing Constructive Collaborations Being educated in New York State, beginning in the State University system as an undergraduate and ending up for graduate studies at Syracuse University when audiology was in its heyday, I’ve been very fortunate to have studied with many leaders and innovative thinkers in the field (Zwislocki, Feldman, DiCarlo, ... Editorial
Editorial  |   June 01, 2008
Toward Developing Constructive Collaborations
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anthony T. Cacace
    American Journal of Audiology
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   June 01, 2008
Toward Developing Constructive Collaborations
American Journal of Audiology, June 2008, Vol. 17, 2. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2008/001)
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2008, Vol. 17, 2. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2008/001)
Being educated in New York State, beginning in the State University system as an undergraduate and ending up for graduate studies at Syracuse University when audiology was in its heyday, I’ve been very fortunate to have studied with many leaders and innovative thinkers in the field (Zwislocki, Feldman, DiCarlo, Mills, Wright, Henderson, Margolis, Turner, and others). Also noteworthy were meetings of the New York State Speech and Hearing Association when they were held at the resort hotels in the Catskill Mountains. They were always well attended by many colorful individuals from Long Island, New York City (especially Brooklyn), Westchester County, Syracuse, and up to Buffalo. They were scientifically rigorous and always memorable events, attended by both speech-language pathologists and audiologists. The main point that I wish to emphasize here was the unique ambience that was always in the air. The atmosphere was one of congeniality combined with strong opinions and often intense interchanges (certain voices could be recognized above others), and dialogue between speech and hearing scientists, clinicians and therapists, whether it was in lecture halls, in hallways, at the bar, in the infamous dining rooms, or on the golf course. The interchanges were informative and, in retrospect, always seemed to have advanced the field. Initially as a student and then as a professional, attending these conventions was always an interesting, educational, fun, and stimulating experience.
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