Editorial  |   June 2011
War Injuries
Article Information
Editorial   |   June 2011
War Injuries
American Journal of Audiology, June 2011, Vol. 20, 1-2. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/ed-01)
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2011, Vol. 20, 1-2. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/ed-01)
Although the inevitability of warfare and physical violence in human societies has been associated with extensive debate, the reality is that conflict has been commonplace across the world and throughout history (Kelly, 2000; Walker, 2001). Archeological and anthropological evidence suggests that warfare and the treatment of wounds were elements of prehistoric life (Allison & Trunkey, 2009; Walker, 2001). Warfare became highly organized in various areas of the ancient world such as ancient China (Hui, 2005; Sawyer & Sawyer, 2007), the Akkadian Empire and Babylonia in Mesopotamia, and the Mediterranean region with the rise of Mycenaean civilization on through the Classical Era to the collapse of the Roman Empire (Cartledge, 1977; Fuller, 1998; Warry, 2004). High mortality rates and severe injuries were expected outcomes of combat, although up until World War II, more warriors died from disease due to poor sanitation and a lack of infectious disease prevention and treatment than any other causes (Trunkey, 2000). For example, during the Crimean War and the American Civil War, over twice as many soldiers died from disease than in battle (Trunkey, 2000; Woodward, 1875). In World War I, a total of 53,402 U.S. soldiers died in battle, whereas 63,114 died from disease.
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