Research Article  |   June 2011
Computerized Administration and Scoring of the Dichotic Nonsense Syllable Test
 
Author Notes
  • Correspondence to Conrad Lundeen: clundeen@wvu.edu
  • Editor: Sheila Pratt
    Editor: Sheila Pratt×
  • Associate Editor: Brad Rakerd
    Associate Editor: Brad Rakerd×
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody
Research Article   |   June 2011
Computerized Administration and Scoring of the Dichotic Nonsense Syllable Test
American Journal of Audiology, June 2011, Vol. 20, 3-8. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/10-0024)
History: Received July 1, 2010 , Revised November 12, 2010 , Accepted March 2, 2011
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2011, Vol. 20, 3-8. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/10-0024)
History: Received July 1, 2010; Revised November 12, 2010; Accepted March 2, 2011

Purpose: A user-friendly computer program was designed to administer the dichotic nonsense syllable test (DNST). Computer automation makes it easier for listeners to perform the response task appropriately and for audiologists to administer and accurately score the test.

Method: The program presents test stimuli in a user-controlled, self-paced sequence; provides an easy-to-use client interface to collect listener responses; verifies that appropriate responses are recorded before proceeding with the test; scores responses automatically; and stores the information in an electronic format that is easy to analyze and archive.

Results: The automated DNST protocol is described. Verification tests confirm the accuracy of stimulus sequencing, response recording, and test scoring.

Conclusions: Computer automation makes administering the DNST easier, ensures the accuracy of test scoring, and simplifies the analysis and archiving of results. These refinements may make the DNST more useful to clinicians. Further research is required to establish normative data for this version of the DNST.

Acknowledgments
I would like to acknowledge Richard H. Wilson, Senior Research Career Scientist at the VA Medical Center in Mountain Home, TN, for his invaluable assistance in providing the calibration tone and test stimulus wav files used in this project. Paul Brown helped develop and debug the computer code, and deserves special thanks.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access