The Influence of Receiver Size on Magnitude of Acoustic and Perceived Measures of Occlusion Purpose The current study examined measured and perceived occlusion for a receiver-in-the-canal (RIC) hearing aid with different-sized receivers. The relationship between these measures and ear canal volume was also investigated. Method Thirty adult participants were fitted with an RIC hearing aid and tested with 5 receiver size conditions. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2011
The Influence of Receiver Size on Magnitude of Acoustic and Perceived Measures of Occlusion
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristin A. Vasil-Dilaj
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Kathleen M. Cienkowski
    University of Connecticut, Storrs
  • Correspondence to Kristin A. Vasil-Dilaj: kvdilaj@gmail.com
  • Editor: Sheila Pratt
    Editor: Sheila Pratt×
  • Associate Editor: Ruth Bentler
    Associate Editor: Ruth Bentler×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research and Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2011
The Influence of Receiver Size on Magnitude of Acoustic and Perceived Measures of Occlusion
American Journal of Audiology, June 2011, Vol. 20, 61-68. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2010/09-0031)
History: Received November 8, 2009 , Revised June 4, 2010 , Accepted December 7, 2010
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2011, Vol. 20, 61-68. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2010/09-0031)
History: Received November 8, 2009; Revised June 4, 2010; Accepted December 7, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose The current study examined measured and perceived occlusion for a receiver-in-the-canal (RIC) hearing aid with different-sized receivers. The relationship between these measures and ear canal volume was also investigated.

Method Thirty adult participants were fitted with an RIC hearing aid and tested with 5 receiver size conditions. Measured occlusion effect was calculated from aided and unaided real-ear responses obtained while subjects vocalized /i/. Perceived occlusion measures were acquired using an occlusion effect scale.

Results Measured occlusion was greatest for the largest receiver. The most common perceived occlusion ratings were none to mild occlusion for all receiver sizes. Perceived ratings were weakly correlated to acoustic measures. There was little to no correlation between receiver size and estimated ear canal volume.

Conclusions Measured and perceived occlusion was minor in all receiver conditions. Occlusion was not correlated to ear canal volume, suggesting that RIC hearing aids most often result in negligible amounts of measured and perceived occlusion effect, regardless of ear canal size. Because no significant relationship existed between the occlusion measures, clinicians may need to consider that self-rating of occlusion may not match measured occlusion results.

Acknowledgments
This research was sponsored by a grant from Vivatone, LLC. We would like to thank TeeMarie Ballingham for her time and effort in collecting data, and Ralph Campagna at United Hearing Systems for providing the receiver sleeves and ear canal volume measures. Portions of this article were presented at the 2005 Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in San Diego, CA.
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