Neuroaudiologic Correlates to Anatomical Changes of the Brain 1. There appears to be a relationship among the improved overall behavior of this patient, anatomical changes in the brain, and enhanced performance of both psychophysical and electrophysiological central auditory tests. 2. The right-sided peripheral hearing loss was one of the primary indicators for further diagnostic workup, but probably is ... Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds  |   November 01, 1991
Neuroaudiologic Correlates to Anatomical Changes of the Brain
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Frank E. Musiek
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, NH
  • Suzanne Lenz
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, NH
  • Karen M. Gollegly
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Hanover, NH
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Clinical Focus / Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds   |   November 01, 1991
Neuroaudiologic Correlates to Anatomical Changes of the Brain
American Journal of Audiology, November 1991, Vol. 1, 19-24. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0101.19
History: Received June 18, 1991 , Accepted August 12, 1991
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1991, Vol. 1, 19-24. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0101.19
History: Received June 18, 1991; Accepted August 12, 1991

1. There appears to be a relationship among the improved overall behavior of this patient, anatomical changes in the brain, and enhanced performance of both psychophysical and electrophysiological central auditory tests.

2. The right-sided peripheral hearing loss was one of the primary indicators for further diagnostic workup, but probably is unrelated to the lesion that was later discovered.

3. In demonstrating structural as well as functional improvement, this case demonstrates the plasticity of the young human brain.

Acknowledgement
The authors would like to thank Rita Mueller for her contribution to this study.
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