Otologists and the Audiometer A 70th Year Report Perspective
Perspective  |   November 01, 1991
Otologists and the Audiometer
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martin S. Robinette
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Perspective
Perspective   |   November 01, 1991
Otologists and the Audiometer
American Journal of Audiology, November 1991, Vol. 1, 7. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0101.07
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1991, Vol. 1, 7. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0101.07
In the first week of May 1922, at the 55th annual meeting of the Otological Society, an otologist, Edmund Price Fowler, and a physicist with the Western Electric Company, R.L. Wegel, introduced the first commercial electronic audiometer, the Western Electric 1A. Wegel explained the new instrument for determining the “amount” and “character” of auditory sensation, with hearing sensitivity being plotted on charts called “audiograms” and normal hearing appearing as a straight line.
Clinicians had their doubts about this new “machine.” After all, at the business meeting, Edward B. Dench (Chairman of the Committee on the Standardization of Tuning Forks) reported that the Galton Whistle was the instrument of choice to measure the “upper tone limit.”
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