Real Ear Sound Pressure Levels Developed by Three Portable Stereo System Earphones Differences in real ear sound pressure levels (SPLs) with three portable stereo system (PSS) earphones (supraaural [Sony Model MDR-44], semiaural [Sony Model MDR-A15L], and insert [Sony Model MDR-E225]) were investigated. Twelve adult men served as subjects. Frequency response, high frequency average (HFA) output, peak output, peak output frequency, and overall ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1992
Real Ear Sound Pressure Levels Developed by Three Portable Stereo System Earphones
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gail L. MacLean
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Andrew Stuart
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
  • Robert Stenstrom
    McGill University, Montréal, Province of Quebec, Canada
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1992
Real Ear Sound Pressure Levels Developed by Three Portable Stereo System Earphones
American Journal of Audiology, November 1992, Vol. 1, 52-55. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0104.52
History: Received December 18, 1991 , Accepted May 22, 1992
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1992, Vol. 1, 52-55. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0104.52
History: Received December 18, 1991; Accepted May 22, 1992

Differences in real ear sound pressure levels (SPLs) with three portable stereo system (PSS) earphones (supraaural [Sony Model MDR-44], semiaural [Sony Model MDR-A15L], and insert [Sony Model MDR-E225]) were investigated. Twelve adult men served as subjects. Frequency response, high frequency average (HFA) output, peak output, peak output frequency, and overall RMS output for each PSS earphone were obtained with a probe tube microphone system (Fonix 6500 Hearing Aid Test System). Results indicated a significant difference in mean RMS outputs with nonsignificant differences in mean HFA outputs, peak outputs, and peak output frequencies among PSS earphones. Differences in mean overall RMS outputs were attributed to differences in low-frequency effects that were observed among the frequency responses of the three PSS earphones. It is suggested that one cannot assume equivalent real ear SPLs, with equivalent inputs, among different styles of PSS earphones.

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