Frequency Response Options for People With Low-Frequency Sensorineural Hearing Loss Six listeners with low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss completed objective and subjective speech recognition tasks while listening to signals spectrally shaped to replicate traditional low-pass amplification and various alternative schemes. The alternative schemes included high-pass, broadband, and K-bass responses. Both objectively and subjectively, listeners achieved greater benefit from the alternative amplification ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1992
Frequency Response Options for People With Low-Frequency Sensorineural Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald J. Schum
    The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City
  • M. Jane Collins
    Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1992
Frequency Response Options for People With Low-Frequency Sensorineural Hearing Loss
American Journal of Audiology, November 1992, Vol. 1, 56-62. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0104.56
History: Received November 19, 1991 , Accepted May 1, 1992
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1992, Vol. 1, 56-62. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0104.56
History: Received November 19, 1991; Accepted May 1, 1992

Six listeners with low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss completed objective and subjective speech recognition tasks while listening to signals spectrally shaped to replicate traditional low-pass amplification and various alternative schemes. The alternative schemes included high-pass, broadband, and K-bass responses. Both objectively and subjectively, listeners achieved greater benefit from the alternative amplification schemes than from low-pass amplification. A case example is presented in which a person with low-frequency hearing loss and a previous history of unsuccessful hearing aid use has been using high-frequency emphasis amplification successfully for the past 6 years. The results call into question the clinical practice of providing amplification only in the region of hearing loss for listeners with low-frequency impairments.

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