Auditory Brain Stem Responses Recorded With Uncushioned Earphones Although the cushion is essential to accurate pure-tone audiometry with conventional earphones, it may interfere with the auditory brain stem response (ABR) testing of small infants because of its size and the risk of ear canal collapse. To determine the consequences of ABR testing with an uncushioned earphone, adults were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1992
Auditory Brain Stem Responses Recorded With Uncushioned Earphones
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger R. Marsh
    Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, PA
  • Carol A. Knightly
    Children's Seashore House, Philadelphia, PA
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1992
Auditory Brain Stem Responses Recorded With Uncushioned Earphones
American Journal of Audiology, November 1992, Vol. 1, 63-65. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0104.63
History: Received February 26, 1992 , Accepted June 11, 1992
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1992, Vol. 1, 63-65. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0104.63
History: Received February 26, 1992; Accepted June 11, 1992

Although the cushion is essential to accurate pure-tone audiometry with conventional earphones, it may interfere with the auditory brain stem response (ABR) testing of small infants because of its size and the risk of ear canal collapse. To determine the consequences of ABR testing with an uncushioned earphone, adults were tested with and without the cushion, and probe-tube sound measurements were made. Although removing the cushion results in substantial signal attenuation below 1 kHz, there is little effect on the click-elicited ABR.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access