Tests of Function Versus Tests of Structure Audiologic tests of function and radiologic tests of structure have historically complemented the neurotological examination of patients suspected for retrocochlear involvement. It has been relatively common, for example, to evaluate patients at risk for VIII nerve tumor by both audiologic tests of function (audiogram, speech testing, acoustic reflexes, ABR) and ... Edge Report
Edge Report  |   March 01, 1992
Tests of Function Versus Tests of Structure
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christopher D. Bauch
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Practice Management / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Edge Reports
Edge Report   |   March 01, 1992
Tests of Function Versus Tests of Structure
American Journal of Audiology, March 1992, Vol. 1, 17-18. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0102.17
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1992, Vol. 1, 17-18. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0102.17
Audiologic tests of function and radiologic tests of structure have historically complemented the neurotological examination of patients suspected for retrocochlear involvement. It has been relatively common, for example, to evaluate patients at risk for VIII nerve tumor by both audiologic tests of function (audiogram, speech testing, acoustic reflexes, ABR) and radiologic (computerized tomography [CT] or magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]) means. However, the necessity of tests of function is being questioned for neurotologic diagnosis by some practitioners. The issue pertains to whether the audiologic tests contribute meaningful information to the neurotologist. Adding complexity to the issue are separate questions of cost to the patient and third-party reimbursement for services, both of which influence the test strategies.
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