Assistive Listening Devices Videotext Displays Edge Report
Edge Report  |   March 01, 1992
Assistive Listening Devices
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia L. Compton
    Gallaudet University, Washington, DC
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Edge Reports
Edge Report   |   March 01, 1992
Assistive Listening Devices
American Journal of Audiology, March 1992, Vol. 1, 19-20. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0102.19
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1992, Vol. 1, 19-20. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0102.19
We are all familiar with the use of assistive listening devices (ALDs) in group meetings and lectures. Thanks to FM, infrared, and audio loop technologies, millions of Americans can now tune in to these events by using the appropriate receiver—with or without a hearing aid. However, there are a significant number of people who, regardless of the degree of hearing loss, continue to have difficulty understanding speech in these situations. Speechreading may help many of these individuals, but speechreading is not always feasible in large lecture halls and many people cannot speechread sufficiently, even under the best environmental conditions. Sign language interpreters can also be provided, but many people do not know sign language. Thus, those with limited auditory speech recognition ability are left out of the communication loop.
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