Aspects of a Private Practice Private practice audiology has experienced tremendous development over the last 20 years. The number of audiologists in successful private practice in 1991 suggests that this aspect of audiology, encompassing hearing measurement, counseling, ENG/AER assessment, hearing instrumentation, as well as entrepreneurial skills, not only provides services effectively and ethically, but provides ... Clinical Focus: Site Visit
Clinical Focus: Site Visit  |   March 1992
Aspects of a Private Practice
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert H. Payne
    Clinical Director, John H. Payne Associates, Inc., Indianapolis
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Clinical Focus / Site Visit
Clinical Focus: Site Visit   |   March 1992
Aspects of a Private Practice
American Journal of Audiology, March 1992, Vol. 1, 27-32. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0102.27
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1992, Vol. 1, 27-32. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0102.27
Private practice audiology has experienced tremendous development over the last 20 years. The number of audiologists in successful private practice in 1991 suggests that this aspect of audiology, encompassing hearing measurement, counseling, ENG/AER assessment, hearing instrumentation, as well as entrepreneurial skills, not only provides services effectively and ethically, but provides economic stability for the practitioner. The impact of private practice on audiology has been so great that alternative educational models are currently being proposed that would create and strengthen a new professional position from which audiologists could enter an increasingly competitive marketplace. Private practice has created new job settings for audiology when traditional employment opportunities did not meet professional, economic, or personal goals. Even those skeptics of early private practice have had to reconsider the contribution it has made to our profession. This change in attitude might best be illustrated by contrasting the present view of private practice with one expressed by the title of an article about our own practice, “A Professional Private Practice,” as if these terms in close proximity, professional and private practice, created a provocative juxtaposition.
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