Probe-Tube Microphone Measures of Vent Effects With In-the-Canal Hearing Aid Shells The acoustic effects of three different configurations of vented in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid shells were investigated. Real-ear sound pressure level measures (200–2000 Hz) were obtained from unvented and vented ITC shells from 12 adult subjects. In general, with increasing vent size, an increase in the amount of low-frequency reduction and ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 1992
Probe-Tube Microphone Measures of Vent Effects With In-the-Canal Hearing Aid Shells
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrew Stuart, MSc
    School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Robert Stenstrom
    Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario
  • Odilia MacDonald
    Glace Bay, Nova Scotia
  • Mark P. Schmidt
    Unitron Industries Ltd., Kitchener, Ontario
  • Gail MacLean
    School of Human Communication Disorders, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • This is a revised version of a report that originally appeared in the October 1991 issue of the NAL Auricle, the newsletter for the Hearing Services Program, Australia. Used with permission.
    This is a revised version of a report that originally appeared in the October 1991 issue of the NAL Auricle, the newsletter for the Hearing Services Program, Australia. Used with permission.×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 1992
Probe-Tube Microphone Measures of Vent Effects With In-the-Canal Hearing Aid Shells
American Journal of Audiology, March 1992, Vol. 1, 58-62. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0102.58
History: Received May 11, 1991 , Accepted August 14, 1991
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1992, Vol. 1, 58-62. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0102.58
History: Received May 11, 1991; Accepted August 14, 1991

The acoustic effects of three different configurations of vented in-the-canal (ITC) hearing aid shells were investigated. Real-ear sound pressure level measures (200–2000 Hz) were obtained from unvented and vented ITC shells from 12 adult subjects. In general, with increasing vent size, an increase in the amount of low-frequency reduction and an upward shift in vent kneepoints and vent-associated resonance occurred. The use of venting may be considered clinically for low-frequency reduction in ITC hearing aid frequency responses.

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