4000 Hz Noise Damage Approximately 10 million people in the United States have developed hearing loss as a result of high level noise exposure. Demographic studies of occupational noise-induced hearing loss as well as controlled laboratory studies have shown that, for a given exposure level, the greatest amount of hearing loss occurs in ... Clinical Focus: Consult
Clinical Focus: Consult  |   March 01, 1993
4000 Hz Noise Damage
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard J. Salvi, PhD
    Hearing Research Laboratories, 215 Parker Hall, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus: Consult   |   March 01, 1993
4000 Hz Noise Damage
American Journal of Audiology, March 1993, Vol. 2, 21. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0201.21
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1993, Vol. 2, 21. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0201.21
Approximately 10 million people in the United States have developed hearing loss as a result of high level noise exposure. Demographic studies of occupational noise-induced hearing loss as well as controlled laboratory studies have shown that, for a given exposure level, the greatest amount of hearing loss occurs in the 3–6 kHz region, with the peak loss typically occurring at 4 kHz. Several different mechanisms may make the auditory system more vulnerable to hearing loss in the 4kHz region. One hypothesis is that the anatomical structures of the inner ear associated with the 4 kHz region are simply more susceptible to acoustic trauma.
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