Cochlear Implants and the Deaf Culture It is important that the impact of cochlear implants on Deaf culture be discussed and understood in a reasonable, accurate and dispassionate fashion. Knowledge about Deaf culture is often limited in many professionals, including audiologists. Similarly, there is misunderstanding and apprehension about cochlear implants by some members of the ... Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds  |   March 1993
Cochlear Implants and the Deaf Culture
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard S. Tyler, PhD
    Department of Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Clinical Focus / Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds   |   March 1993
Cochlear Implants and the Deaf Culture
American Journal of Audiology, March 1993, Vol. 2, 26-32. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0201.26
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1993, Vol. 2, 26-32. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0201.26
Acknowledgments
The author is supported by NIH/NINCDS Program Project Grant N520466, NIDCD 00242 and NIH grant RR59 from the General Clinical Research Centers Program, National Center for Research Resources.
I would like to express my appreciation to Harlan Lane, Charlie Anderson, Carolyn (Los Angeles) Brown, Nancy Tye-Murray, Danielle Kelsay, Karen Iler Kirk, Anne Geers, James H. Hanson, Sharon Hellman, and Holly Fryauf-Bertschy for their helpful discussions on this topic and their comments on the manuscript. Obviously, the content of this article does not necessarily reflect their opinions.
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