Past Is Past One of the most difficult aspects of preparing for the future is terminating or redirecting preparation for what has become the past. For example, audiology has long been seeking recognition as a profession, while failing to notice that the term no longer symbolizes the original goal. We still think ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   March 01, 1993
Past Is Past
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aaron Thornton, PhD
    Audiology Service, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, 243 Charles Street, Boston, MA 02114-3096
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Viewpoint
Viewpoint   |   March 01, 1993
Past Is Past
American Journal of Audiology, March 1993, Vol. 2, 5. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0201.05
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1993, Vol. 2, 5. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0201.05
One of the most difficult aspects of preparing for the future is terminating or redirecting preparation for what has become the past. For example, audiology has long been seeking recognition as a profession, while failing to notice that the term no longer symbolizes the original goal. We still think of professionalism in the traditional context of dedication (church), principal (law), learning (education and science), and healing (medicine). Over time, however, the word came to be associated with the prestige, power, and wealth bestowed on the members. Out of hope for similar results, the list of self-declared professions grew to eventually include all paid occupations. Yet we still find it important to convince others that we are a profession.
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