RE: Jerger, J. F. (1991). Milestones and boundaries. American Journal of Audiology, 1(1), 6; and Jerger, J. F. (1992). Reply to Kileny and Shepard. American Journal of Audiology, 1(2), 11–12 I am briefly commenting on Dr. James Jerger’s observations on what activities encompass Audiology. Over a decade ago I was asked my opinion on electronystagmography and I answered by questioning what has it to do with communication. Since that time I have become convinced the vestibular system plays a role ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   March 01, 1993
RE: Jerger, J. F. (1991). Milestones and boundaries. American Journal of Audiology, 1(1), 6; and Jerger, J. F. (1992). Reply to Kileny and Shepard. American Journal of Audiology, 1(2), 11–12
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martin L. Lenhardt
    Richmond, VA
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   March 01, 1993
RE: Jerger, J. F. (1991). Milestones and boundaries. American Journal of Audiology, 1(1), 6; and Jerger, J. F. (1992). Reply to Kileny and Shepard. American Journal of Audiology, 1(2), 11–12
American Journal of Audiology, March 1993, Vol. 2, 6-c. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0201.06d
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1993, Vol. 2, 6-c. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0201.06d
I am briefly commenting on Dr. James Jerger’s observations on what activities encompass Audiology. Over a decade ago I was asked my opinion on electronystagmography and I answered by questioning what has it to do with communication. Since that time I have become convinced the vestibular system plays a role in hearing and communication, a role that audiologists have yet to tap. I continue to have little interest in electronystagmography, but I am most reluctant to abandon the majority of receptor areas in an organ as small as the ear to Otolaryngology only because hearing is conventionally thought to reside in one particular site. Phylogenetically, the vestibular system is the auditory system in some vertebrates and it is very likely humans have retained some element of this function. It is precisely the auditory function of the vestibular system that places it squarely within the domain of Audiology, if only in a comparative sense. We have made arbitrary clinical distinctions between sensory receptors in the inner ear as “gravity” versus “sound,” when in fact both respond to mechanical displacement. Recall, Audiology has been traditionally defined as the science of hearing; and hearing can involve alternative receptors, channels, and neural pathways.
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