Canal Hearing Aids For or Against Face-to-Face
Face-to-Face  |   March 01, 1993
Canal Hearing Aids
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael P. Rosenblatt
    Dahlberg, Inc., 4101 Dahlberg Drive, Golden Valley, MN 55422
    Director of Audiological and Technical Services
  • Robert G. Paul, PhD
    Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705
    Chief of Audiology/Speech Pathology
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Face-to-Face
Face-to-Face   |   March 01, 1993
Canal Hearing Aids
American Journal of Audiology, March 1993, Vol. 2, 7-12. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0201.07
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1993, Vol. 2, 7-12. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0201.07
Rosenblatt: Given consumer preference for small hearing aids, it is curious that canal hearing aids haven’t captured a greater market share. Although yearly sales have been growing since canal aids became a market factor in 1984, the upsurge in demand that many anticipated has not materialized.
I believe it makes sense to take a look at some possible reasons only about one in four of all 1992 hearing instrument fittings was a canal aid.
Canal hearing instruments were not widely marketed in the United States until 1983, and didn’t really have an impact on sales from a volume standpoint until 1984. In 1984 they represented approximately 14.2% of in-the-ear sales and about 8% of all sales (Cranmer, 1992). By 1992 they accounted for 31.5% of in-the-ear sales and 25.5% of all sales (Kirkwood, 1992).
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