But Clients Often Use Less Gain Than Prescribed The prescriptive hearing aid fitting procedures used most frequently embody a modification of the “half-gain rule” (Lybarger, 1963). Lybarger found that persons with sensorineural hearing loss tended to use operating gain (also called preferred gain or use gain) amounting to one-half of their average hearing threshold level (HTL). For example, ... Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds  |   July 01, 1993
But Clients Often Use Less Gain Than Prescribed
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth W. Berger, PhD
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242.
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Clinical Focus / Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds   |   July 01, 1993
But Clients Often Use Less Gain Than Prescribed
American Journal of Audiology, July 1993, Vol. 2, 17-18. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0202.17
History: Received September 12, 1992 , Accepted January 7, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1993, Vol. 2, 17-18. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0202.17
History: Received September 12, 1992; Accepted January 7, 1993
The prescriptive hearing aid fitting procedures used most frequently embody a modification of the “half-gain rule” (Lybarger, 1963). Lybarger found that persons with sensorineural hearing loss tended to use operating gain (also called preferred gain or use gain) amounting to one-half of their average hearing threshold level (HTL). For example, someone with a 60 dB HTL typically chose 30 dB of gain.
The NAL revised (NAL-R) procedure calls for somewhat less gain than 50% (Byrne & Dillon, 1986), the Berger method more than 50% for most hearing loss patterns (Berger, Hagberg, & Rane, 1989), and POGO about 50% unless the loss is severe, in which case additional gain is prescribed (McCandless & Lyregaard, 1983).
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