Fitting Strategies for Multiple-Memory Programmable Hearing Instruments Fitting a multiple-memory programmable hearing instrument presents a new set of challenges to the dispenser, compared to conventional fittings. Rather than having to compromise on a single frequency-gain response (the prescriptive target), it is now possible to create a family of hearing aid responses from which the user can select ... Short Course
Short Course  |   July 01, 1993
Fitting Strategies for Multiple-Memory Programmable Hearing Instruments
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul H. Stypulkowski, PhD
    Hearing Health, Life Sciences Sector, 3M Company, Building 260-6A-18, St. Paul, MN 55144-1000
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Short Courses
Short Course   |   July 01, 1993
Fitting Strategies for Multiple-Memory Programmable Hearing Instruments
American Journal of Audiology, July 1993, Vol. 2, 19-28. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0202.19
History: Received February 18, 1993 , Accepted March 18, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1993, Vol. 2, 19-28. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0202.19
History: Received February 18, 1993; Accepted March 18, 1993

Fitting a multiple-memory programmable hearing instrument presents a new set of challenges to the dispenser, compared to conventional fittings. Rather than having to compromise on a single frequency-gain response (the prescriptive target), it is now possible to create a family of hearing aid responses from which the user can select an appropriate response for a given situation. This philosophy is also applicable in the prescription of compression characteristics. The flexibility designed into the 3M two-channel compression system allows the dispenser to program very different types of signal processing strategies (low frequency compression, high frequency compression, full spectrum compression, or linear processing) into a single instrument to match the requirements of different listening environments and to meet the needs of different users. Utilizing this approach, comfort, speech intelligibility, and sound quality can be optimized in a variety of situations by considering the listener's acoustic environment and the input signals to which the hearing aid must respond.

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