A Different Approach to the Noise Problem of the Hearing Impaired Hearing aid design to alleviate the noise problem has concentrated on improving the signal-to-noise ratio with the aid, using devices such as directional microphones, adaptive filters, and circuits that discriminate between steady-state noise and speech. The design approach discussed here is directed at improving the speech recognition of hearing-impaired listeners ... Short Course
Short Course  |   July 01, 1993
A Different Approach to the Noise Problem of the Hearing Impaired
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edgar Villchur
    Foundation for Hearing Aid Research, P.O. Box 306, Woodstock, NY 12498
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Short Courses
Short Course   |   July 01, 1993
A Different Approach to the Noise Problem of the Hearing Impaired
American Journal of Audiology, July 1993, Vol. 2, 47-51. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0202.47
History: Received February 18, 1993 , Accepted March 22, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1993, Vol. 2, 47-51. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0202.47
History: Received February 18, 1993; Accepted March 22, 1993

Hearing aid design to alleviate the noise problem has concentrated on improving the signal-to-noise ratio with the aid, using devices such as directional microphones, adaptive filters, and circuits that discriminate between steady-state noise and speech. The design approach discussed here is directed at improving the speech recognition of hearing-impaired listeners at a given signal-to-noise ratio, by restoring to their perception speech cues they no longer hear because of their impairment. This allows them to retain more of the redundant information in speech after masking has taken its toll, and empowers their ability to separate desired from undesired signals (what Broadbent calls "selective listening" in persons with normal hearing). Experimental results are presented.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access