The K-Amp Hearing Aid An Attempt to Present High Fidelity for Persons With Impaired Hearing Short Course
EDITOR'S AWARD
Short Course  |   July 01, 1993
The K-Amp Hearing Aid
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mead C. Killion, PhD
    Etymotic Research, 61 Martin Lane, Elk Grove Village, IL 60007
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Short Courses
Short Course   |   July 01, 1993
The K-Amp Hearing Aid
American Journal of Audiology, July 1993, Vol. 2, 52-74. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0202.52
History: Received February 18, 1993 , Accepted March 22, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1993, Vol. 2, 52-74. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0202.52
History: Received February 18, 1993; Accepted March 22, 1993

The reason no one wants to be seen wearing hearing aids is probably that they don't work well, or at least they didn't. When the problems with such hearing aids are solved, a new/old problem arises: Background noises are often blamed on the hearing aid. The problem is that the user has lost ABONSO (automatic brain-operated noise suppressor option), and the problem persists until the user relearns how to recognize and localize background noises (at which time the brain automatically performs as a highly effective noise suppressor option). Ongoing attempts to replace the brain with a tiny circuit that will somehow reject noises we don't want to hear are unlikely to result in useful devices.

Acknowledgments
I would like to acknowledge that much of what I say today as if I had thought of it myself is based on the thinking and research of others. A few of those others have been especially important to me personally in shaping my own thinking, and I would like to acknowledge them: Elmer Carlson, Hugh Knowles, Edgar Villchur, Dave Pascoe, Margo Skinner (who has my vote as the world’s best experimentalist), Tom Tillman, Sam Lybarger, Jesper Barfod, and Hy Goldberg.
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