Halfway There! On March 3, 1993, in Washington, DC, an audience of 700 people rose to its feet and fervently applauded the NIH Consensus Conference Committee’s announcement of approval of universal newborn hearing screening. Not only did the committee endorse universal screening, but it also specified instrumentations that would be acceptable for ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   July 01, 1993
Halfway There!
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marion P. Downs, DHS
    Otolaryngology, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, 4200 E. Ninth Ave., Denver, CO 80220
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Healthcare Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Viewpoints
Viewpoint   |   July 01, 1993
Halfway There!
American Journal of Audiology, July 1993, Vol. 2, 6. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0202.06
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1993, Vol. 2, 6. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0202.06
On March 3, 1993, in Washington, DC, an audience of 700 people rose to its feet and fervently applauded the NIH Consensus Conference Committee’s announcement of approval of universal newborn hearing screening. Not only did the committee endorse universal screening, but it also specified instrumentations that would be acceptable for such programs.1  The sense of jubilation among professionals was tangible and intense, culminating a 3-day meeting during which evidence was presented justifying the final decision to endorse universal neonatal hearing screening. Finally, we thought, the long campaign to secure the right of newborns to be screened for hearing was over. This conference, sponsored by four branches of the National Institutes of Health, placed the imprimatur of the government on our cherished goal.
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