Behavioral Special Tests For lesions of the peripheral auditory system, including those producing conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, the special auditory test battery traditionally included loudness balancing, tone decay, Bekesy audiometry, SISI, and some form of monotic speech discrimination task, such as plotting of an articulation function. All these require the client to ... Clinical Focus: Consult
Clinical Focus: Consult  |   November 01, 1993
Behavioral Special Tests
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Douglas Noffsinger, PhD
    Audiology and Speech Pathology (126), West Los Angeles VA Medical Center, Wilshire and Sawtelle Boulevards, Los Angeles, CA 90073
    Chief
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus: Consult   |   November 01, 1993
Behavioral Special Tests
American Journal of Audiology, November 1993, Vol. 2, 17-18. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0203.17
History: Received March 28, 1993 , Accepted July 13, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1993, Vol. 2, 17-18. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0203.17
History: Received March 28, 1993; Accepted July 13, 1993
For lesions of the peripheral auditory system, including those producing conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, the special auditory test battery traditionally included loudness balancing, tone decay, Bekesy audiometry, SISI, and some form of monotic speech discrimination task, such as plotting of an articulation function. All these require the client to do something other than be present: he or she must volunteer a response of some kind. Later inclusions to a peripheral site-of-lesion battery have been tympanometry, acoustic reflex thresholds, and acoustic reflex adaptation (decay). These latter three procedures are less dependent on a subject’s voluntary participation, and they have justifiably been granted more importance in differentiating one kind of peripheral auditory pathology from another than is accorded the older procedures. The acoustic reflex techniques have the added attraction of allowing considerable information to be garnered about the functional integrity of some auditory pathways and waystations in the brainstem. If one adds the information available from evoked potential measurements like the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and, especially for children, the emerging clues available from otoacoustic emission tests to the power of the acoustic impedance battery, then the traditional behavioral tests may seem an unnecessary indulgence.
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