Clinical Considerations in Fitting a Multimemory Hearing Aid Multimemory hearing aids have the potential to better serve individuals with hearing impairment, but the technology is new and operational issues need to be resolved before their full advantages can be realized. The current situation is that not all individuals with hearing impairment would benefit from a multimemory hearing aid ... Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds  |   November 01, 1993
Clinical Considerations in Fitting a Multimemory Hearing Aid
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Francis K. Kuk, PhD
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Clinical Focus / Grand Rounds
Clinical Focus: Grand Rounds   |   November 01, 1993
Clinical Considerations in Fitting a Multimemory Hearing Aid
American Journal of Audiology, November 1993, Vol. 2, 23-27. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0203.23
History: Received October 10, 1992 , Accepted March 11, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1993, Vol. 2, 23-27. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0203.23
History: Received October 10, 1992; Accepted March 11, 1993

Multimemory hearing aids have the potential to better serve individuals with hearing impairment, but the technology is new and operational issues need to be resolved before their full advantages can be realized. The current situation is that not all individuals with hearing impairment would benefit from a multimemory hearing aid and not all multimemory hearing aids have the same features for every individual with hearing impairment. In addition, appropriate memory assignment is crucial to a successful fit. In evaluating a listener for a multimemory hearing aid, one must consider the individual's communication needs and psychophysical skills, his or her acoustic environments, and his or her listening preference. An understanding of the available multimemory devices is necessary in order to select the one that meets these requirements. The initial determination of optimal electroacoustic characteristics for each memory is important, but the need to provide constant support and continued follow-up cannot be overemphasized.

Acknowledgment
I would like to thank the reviewers for their constructive comments on this manuscript. Donald Schum and Michael Valente were especially helpful in this regard. This work was supported in part by grants from the U.S. Department of Education—Innovation and Rehabilitation Research (contracts #H133C90020 and H133C20063).
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