Monocular and Binocular Testing to Improve the Diagnostic Value of Horizontal Optokinetic Nystagmus This report describes the effects of unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions on the binocular and monocular optokinetic nystagmus (OKN). Six subjects who had undergone surgical removal of an acoustic neuroma were compared to 14 normal subjects. Stimuli consisted of 15° vertical stripes projected onto a flat screen 1 m from the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1993
Monocular and Binocular Testing to Improve the Diagnostic Value of Horizontal Optokinetic Nystagmus
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia G. Fowler, PhD
    Audiology-126, VA Medical Center, 5901 East Seventh Street, Long Beach, CA 90822
  • Carol A. Zizz
    Audiology-126, VA Medical Center, 5901 East Seventh Street, Long Beach, CA 90822
  • Robert H. I. Blanks
    Audiology-126, VA Medical Center, 5901 East Seventh Street, Long Beach, CA 90822
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Balance & Balance Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1993
Monocular and Binocular Testing to Improve the Diagnostic Value of Horizontal Optokinetic Nystagmus
American Journal of Audiology, November 1993, Vol. 2, 44-47. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0203.44
History: Received January 28, 1992 , Accepted July 13, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1993, Vol. 2, 44-47. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0203.44
History: Received January 28, 1992; Accepted July 13, 1993

This report describes the effects of unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions on the binocular and monocular optokinetic nystagmus (OKN). Six subjects who had undergone surgical removal of an acoustic neuroma were compared to 14 normal subjects. Stimuli consisted of 15° vertical stripes projected onto a flat screen 1 m from the subject. Stimulus velocities were 15, 30, 45, and 60°/sec. Before surgery, contralateral gain of the slow phase velocity was low, approximately 0.6, compared to 0.9 for ipsilateral gain at 60°/sec. In the acute postoperative period (<30 days), the gains of horizontal OKN were low and symmetrical for both stimulus directions. In the intermediate period (30–60 days postoperative), the OKN was asymmetrical (contralateral gain lower than ipsilateral gain), with the greatest discrepancy at 60°/sec. During the chronic phase (>2 months) the OKN was still asymmetrical in 3 of the 6 subjects. These data suggest that monocular and binocular optokinetic testing can be used to monitor the vestibular compensation of subjects following vestibular nerve section.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported in part by the Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC. Portions were presented at the November 1991 annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Atlanta, GA. The authors would like to thank Janet E. Shanks for her contributions.
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