Effects of Maternal Cocaine Abuse on Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Responses Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded from 18 neonates born to mothers who used cocaine during pregnancy, and from 18 control infants matched to the cocaine group on the basis of birthweight and conceptional age. ABRs were elicited using click signals presented at 40, 60, and 80 dB nHL at ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1993
Effects of Maternal Cocaine Abuse on Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Responses
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara Cone-Wesson, PhD
    LAC+USC Medical Center, University of Southern California School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 1200 N. State Street, Box 795, Los Angeles, CA 90033
  • Aaron Spingarn
    Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, New York
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1993
Effects of Maternal Cocaine Abuse on Neonatal Auditory Brainstem Responses
American Journal of Audiology, November 1993, Vol. 2, 48-54. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0203.48
History: Received May 5, 1992 , Accepted January 11, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1993, Vol. 2, 48-54. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0203.48
History: Received May 5, 1992; Accepted January 11, 1993

Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded from 18 neonates born to mothers who used cocaine during pregnancy, and from 18 control infants matched to the cocaine group on the basis of birthweight and conceptional age. ABRs were elicited using click signals presented at 40, 60, and 80 dB nHL at a rate of 33 clicks/sec and also at 11 and 89 clicks/sec at 80 dB nHL. The absolute latencies for ABR components I, III, and V and wave I–V interpeak latencies (IPLs) were measured for each signal condition.

ABR absolute and IPLs for the infants who had been exposed to cocaine were prolonged relative to their age- and weight-matched controls. Neurodevelopmental compromise of the auditory system appears to result from gestational exposure to cocaine.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this paper were presented in a poster session at the American Academy of Audiology, April 1989, Kiawah Island, SC. The authors would like to acknowledge the contributions of Yvonne Sininger, Paul Wu, and the anonymous reviewers who provided insightful critique.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access