Changes in Hearing Sensitivity Following Portable Stereo System Use Changes in hearing sensitivity following portable stereo system (PSS; Sony Walkman Model WM-AF605 with Sony Semiaural Headphones Model MDR-A21L) use were investigated. Test-retest differences (TRDs) in audiometric thresholds at eight frequencies (250, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, & 8000 Hz) were obtained from 15 young adults before and after ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 1993
Changes in Hearing Sensitivity Following Portable Stereo System Use
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Steven Pugsley
    Dalhousie University Department of Psychology, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1
  • Andrew Stuart
    Dalhousie University Department of Psychology, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1
  • Joseph Kalinowski
    Dalhousie University Department of Psychology, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1
  • Joy Armson
    Dalhousie University Department of Psychology, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 4J1
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 1993
Changes in Hearing Sensitivity Following Portable Stereo System Use
American Journal of Audiology, November 1993, Vol. 2, 64-67. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0203.64
History: Received January 12, 1993 , Accepted July 13, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, November 1993, Vol. 2, 64-67. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0203.64
History: Received January 12, 1993; Accepted July 13, 1993

Changes in hearing sensitivity following portable stereo system (PSS; Sony Walkman Model WM-AF605 with Sony Semiaural Headphones Model MDR-A21L) use were investigated. Test-retest differences (TRDs) in audiometric thresholds at eight frequencies (250, 500, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000, 6000, & 8000 Hz) were obtained from 15 young adults before and after one hour of PSS exposure at their preferred listening levels.

Values for the 95% confidence levels representing critical differences in test-retest auditory thresholds for the eight test frequencies were generated from a control group of 15 young adults. Experimental subjects' TRDs, when compared to the critical TRDs, failed to display a decrease in hearing sensitivity after one hour of PSS use. It is suggested that PSS use at preferred listening levels, following an exposure time of one hour, may not contribute to a significant impairment in hearing sensitivity.

Acknowledgments
This article was presented in part at the 18th annual Conference of the Canadian Association of Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada, May 13, 1993. The authors would like to thank W. B. Green for his helpful editorial comments in the preparation of this manuscript. Steven Pugsley is currently affiliated with Audiology Associates, Yarmouth, Nova Scotia. Andrew Stuart is supported by the Medical Research Council of Canada and the Killam Trust, Dalhousie University.
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