Low-Frequency Hearing and the Auditory Brainstem Response How well can you predict low-frequency hearing levels with the ABR? This question has long been a central issue for the audiometric application of auditory brainstem responses (ABR). For many, there has been a general belief that the ABR does not do a good job in predicting low-frequency hearing levels. ... Clinical Focus: Consult
Clinical Focus: Consult  |   July 01, 1994
Low-Frequency Hearing and the Auditory Brainstem Response
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David R. Stapells, PhD
    Auditory Evoked Potential Laboratories, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, R. F. Kennedy Center Room 817, 1410 Pelham Parkway, Bronx, NY 10461
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Clinical Focus / Consult
Clinical Focus: Consult   |   July 01, 1994
Low-Frequency Hearing and the Auditory Brainstem Response
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 11-13. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.11
History: Received November 5, 1993 , Accepted February 11, 1994
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 11-13. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.11
History: Received November 5, 1993; Accepted February 11, 1994
How well can you predict low-frequency hearing levels with the ABR?
This question has long been a central issue for the audiometric application of auditory brainstem responses (ABR). For many, there has been a general belief that the ABR does not do a good job in predicting low-frequency hearing levels. This is certainly true when clicks alone are the stimuli used to elicit the ABR. As I will endeavor to show below, however, the ABR to low-frequency short-duration tones can do a reasonable job of predicting low-frequency thresholds, provided careful attention is paid to several technical and interpretation issues.
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