Mismatch Negativity in the Assessment of Central Auditory Function The mismatch negativity (MMN) is an auditory evoked potential that is undergoing research both on its basic characteristics and its potential clinical applications. Current work indicates that the MMN is a passively elicited measure of the brain's response to stimulus change and is therefore a measure of auditory discrimination. If ... Short Course
Short Course  |   July 01, 1994
Mismatch Negativity in the Assessment of Central Auditory Function
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nina Kraus, PhD
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Therese J. McGee
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Short Courses
Short Course   |   July 01, 1994
Mismatch Negativity in the Assessment of Central Auditory Function
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 39-51. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.39
History: Received May 9, 1993 , Accepted December 15, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 39-51. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.39
History: Received May 9, 1993; Accepted December 15, 1993

The mismatch negativity (MMN) is an auditory evoked potential that is undergoing research both on its basic characteristics and its potential clinical applications. Current work indicates that the MMN is a passively elicited measure of the brain's response to stimulus change and is therefore a measure of auditory discrimination. If the MMN can be evoked by acoustic stimulus differences that are important in everyday communication, it may serve as a tool for evaluating central auditory processing in individuals whose hearing sensitivity is normal but whose history and behavior indicate difficulties in auditory perception.

In this Short Course, we provide an overview of the MMN, how it is recorded and current thinking on what it reflects. We describe its characteristics in normal school-age children, particularly in response to speech stimuli. We also describe our early experience with populations for whom the assessment of central auditory processing is important for clinical management.

Acknowledgments
The contributions of Anu Sharma, Trent Nicol, and Dawn Koch are gratefully acknowledged. Supported by NIH-NIDCD ROI DC01510 and the National Organization for Hearing Research.
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