Auditory Brainstem Response Wave I Prediction of Conductive Component in Infants and Young Children Wave I latencies were used to predict the magnitude of conductive components in 80 infants and young children (122 ears) with normal hearing, conductive hearing loss due to otitis media or aural atresia, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed hearing loss. Two prediction methods were used. The first method based predictions ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1994
Auditory Brainstem Response Wave I Prediction of Conductive Component in Infants and Young Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Carol L. Mackersie
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY City University of New York
  • David R. Stapells
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY City University of New York
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Rose F. Kennedy Center, Rm. 817, 1410 Pelham Parkway, Bronx, NY 10461
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1994
Auditory Brainstem Response Wave I Prediction of Conductive Component in Infants and Young Children
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 52-58. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.52
History: Received March 22, 1993 , Accepted December 15, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 52-58. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.52
History: Received March 22, 1993; Accepted December 15, 1993

Wave I latencies were used to predict the magnitude of conductive components in 80 infants and young children (122 ears) with normal hearing, conductive hearing loss due to otitis media or aural atresia, sensorineural hearing loss, and mixed hearing loss. Two prediction methods were used. The first method based predictions on a 0.03-ms wave I latency delay for each decibel of conductive hearing loss. The second method was based on a regression analysis of wave I latency delays and the magnitude of conductive component for the subjects in this study with normal cochlear status. On average, these prediction methods resulted in prediction errors of 15 dB or greater in over one-third of the ears with hearing loss. Therefore, the clinical use of wave I latencies to predict the presence or magnitude of conductive impairment is not recommended for infants and young children. Instead, bone-conduction ABR testing is recommended as a direct measure of cochlear status when behavioral evaluation is not possible.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by USPHS NIDCD Clinical Center Grant No. 8 P50 DC00223, and by NICHD Mental Retardation Research Center Grant HD01799.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access