The Peripheral Auditory System Is That All There Is? Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   July 01, 1994
The Peripheral Auditory System
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Frank E. Musiek, PhD
    Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, 1 Medical Center Drive, Lebanon, NH 03756
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Viewpoints
Viewpoint   |   July 01, 1994
The Peripheral Auditory System
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 7. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.07
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 7. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.07
The central auditory nervous system (CANS) composes the major portion of the auditory system and is responsible for some of the most important processes in human hearing. Nonetheless, far too few audiologists appropriately consider the CANS when evaluating their patients. Many audiologists view the anatomic correlates to the profession as ranging from the external auditory meatus to the eighth nerve and no further. Early on in our profession, this type of practice was perhaps more acceptable than it is today. As we learn more about the CANS, more attention has been directed toward the measurement of central auditory function and the development of management strategies for dysfunction of the CANS. Now many of the key questions about hearing difficulty may best be explained by studying the CANS and its interactions with the auditory periphery. Despite increased interest in and knowledge of brain functions related to hearing, there still remain a large number of audiologists who seem to believe that the auditory periphery is the beginning and end of the hearing system. For these colleagues, several penetrating concepts regarding the CANS will be mentioned.
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