Evaluation of Hardwire Personal Assistive Listening Devices A large number of personal amplifiers have recently become available commercially. These devices have not been classified as hearing aids by the FDA and are therefore not subject to the FDA rules and regulations governing the sales of hearing aid devices. In this investigation, several of these personal amplifiers were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   July 01, 1994
Evaluation of Hardwire Personal Assistive Listening Devices
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • James J. Dempsey, PhD
    Department of Communication Disorders, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT 06515
  • Mark Ross
    Storrs, CT
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   July 01, 1994
Evaluation of Hardwire Personal Assistive Listening Devices
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 71-77. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0301.71
History: Received May 25, 1993 , Accepted December 15, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 71-77. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0301.71
History: Received May 25, 1993; Accepted December 15, 1993

A large number of personal amplifiers have recently become available commercially. These devices have not been classified as hearing aids by the FDA and are therefore not subject to the FDA rules and regulations governing the sales of hearing aid devices. In this investigation, several of these personal amplifiers were evaluated to determine potential benefits and problems for each device. The devices were evaluated electroacoustically and, also, subjectively by a group of adults with sensorineural hearing loss. The results of the electroacoustic evaluation revealed very sharply peaked frequency responses. The subjective evaluations revealed tremendous variability, with some preferences for power and low-frequency amplification. Clinical implications of these results and suggestions for further research are provided.

Acknowledgments
The research reported in this paper was supported by the Rehabilitation Engineering Center Grant, Number H133E80019, from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR), United States Department of Education, to the Lexington Center, Inc. We would like to thank Walter Goldstein and the members of the South Nassau Chapter of Self-Help for the Hard of Hearing (SHHH) for their enthusiastic participation in this investigation.
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