RE: Rose, D. E. (1994). Viewpoint. AJA, 3(1), 6 The information Rose presents—that 73% of children who had received a cochlear implant are no longer wearing the device—is truly appalling, but perhaps hardly surprising. As he indicates, these children were enrolled in residential schools for the deaf, environments not generally known for their commitment to the use of residual ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   July 01, 1994
RE: Rose, D. E. (1994). Viewpoint. AJA, 3(1), 6
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Ross
    Storrs, CT
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / School-Based Settings / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   July 01, 1994
RE: Rose, D. E. (1994). Viewpoint. AJA, 3(1), 6
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 78. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.78a
 
American Journal of Audiology, July 1994, Vol. 3, 78. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0302.78a
The information Rose presents—that 73% of children who had received a cochlear implant are no longer wearing the device—is truly appalling, but perhaps hardly surprising. As he indicates, these children were enrolled in residential schools for the deaf, environments not generally known for their commitment to the use of residual hearing. Given the dominant value system in these schools, and the relative ease and attractiveness of a manual communication mode for interpersonal communication, the effective development of auditory-oral skills would be a rather unexpected event. There is little encouragement by staff or other students, and little or no advantage, for a child to develop functional auditory-oral skills. Clearly, if the educational setting in which a child is enrolled cannot, or will not, provide an appropriate auditory management program, then the child should never have received an implant in the first place. While a strong auditory management program does not guarantee the effective use of an implant, its lack is almost certainly a prescription for failure.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access